ADHD

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder or ADHD is a neurodevelopmental disorder in children where they are overactive and have difficulty in paying attention and controlling compulsive behaviors. While some children grow out of this condition, some carry it into their adult life.

What Causes ADHD?

The scientific community is yet to set in stone the causes for ADHD. But there are some risk factors that might lead to the condition and sometimes, it’s a combination of different factors. For example:

  • Head/brain injury
  • Born a preemie
  • Exposure to alcohol and drugs during pregnancy
  • Exposure to environmental toxins like lead or mercury during pregnancy or the primitive years.
  • Genetic predisposition

Studies show that boys are more likely to be affected by ADHD than girls. However, girls show mild and subtle symptoms which is why ADHD in girls often go unnoticed, and hence, untreated. 

ADHD is NOT CAUSED by poor parenting, excessive sugar intake, or too much screen time.

Could Your Child Have ADHD? Watch Out For These Symptoms

  • Fidgety with their hands and feet, restless
  • Difficulty in sharing or taking turns
  • Seemingly lost in their thoughts or ‘zoned out’
  • Risk-taking attitude
  • Acting without thinking
  • Lack of attention
  • Difficulty in controlling their actions or ‘behaving’ or ‘acting out’ too often
  • Losing or forgetting things too often
  • Not finishing a project that requires time dedication

When To Seek Treatment For ADHD

“ADHD can be carried to adulthood and can lead to depression, family conflict, low self-esteem, etc. if left untreated. It can prevent your child from succeeding in life,” says Dr. Manoj Kumar, the chief psychiatrist at Serene Mind Clinic. So, it is important that you consult a psychiatrist if you notice an anomaly in your child’s behavior. ADHD is treated with a combination of medicine and therapy. Medications can balance the child’s brain activity while behavioral and family therapy along with parenting skill training can help the child cope better in a world made for neurotypicals.